OWLympics

Making Self Reporting Smarter

Team Members

Rajoshi Biswas (ECE)

Qiong Huang (ECE)

George Chen (ECE)

Problem

Tracking health related behaviors regularly helps in forming good health habits, which greatly improve our health status in the long run. Self-reporting is the most acceptable behavior tracking method, but it suffers from issues like recall bias and low consistency. We propose a novel platform to mitigate these issues: It can send smart reminders to the user's smartphone soon after completion of an activity to be reported; the reminders are based on smart-phone context information such as location, time and historical information. Additionally, to test the effectiveness of the smart reminders in our self-reporting platform, we conducted experiments to quantitatively analyze the effectiveness of our platform.

Report

Read our report titled "OWLympics: A Platform for Smarter Self-reporting"

SPeach

Helping hearing impaired students in the classroom

Team Members

Aaron Roe (CS)

Peter Washington (CS)

Riya Fukui (CS)

Zihe Huang (ECE)

Chase Stewart (ECE)

Andres Cedeno (ECE)

Problem

Over one in seven Americans have some form of hearing disability. Hearing disabilities are a significant barrier in classroom learning; studies have shown that Deaf and Hard of Hearing students lag behind their hearing peers in education. In order to improve comprehension and understanding in lecture settings, SPeach creates real-time speech-to-text transcription with the additional capability of correcting the output for improved accuracy. SPeach will leverage on a student volunteer to perfect a lecture transcript in real-time, with the option for the professor to finalize edits. Other students will be able to view the transcript in real time. The transcripts can then be saved for later. Through our simple, yet powerful automatic captioning system, SPeach improves on existing accommodations for those with a hearing disability.

Report

Read our report titled "SPeach: Automatic Classroom Captioning System for Hearing Impaired"

What we achieved in one semester

  • Built the mobile app, which translates text from the speaker and sends it to a server.
  • Built the server side website, which allows for live editing and viewing the translated text.
  • Made SPeach public: http://speach.herokuapp.com/
  • Performed numerous experiments to determine the effectiveness of the SPeach system.
  • Tested various speech APIs to determine which would be the best for our system.

What we hope to do next

  • Port SPeach to Google Glass.
  • Create a version of SPeach that can be optimized to certain academic subjects.

Tid Bits

  • Our group is evenly divided between 3 computer science and 3 electrical engineering majors.
  • We have many hilarious translations from the Google Speech API which we can share if you ask us!
  • Some examples: "faster than a glacier in a cooler" and "where hygiene becomes prayer. That what it's called the blessed effect"

Hospital in a Toilet

Hospital in a Toilet - Improving Personal Healthcare with every Flush

Team Members

Abhipray Sahoo (ECE)

Evan Dougal (ECE)

Chenxin Fu (ECE)

Jennifer Ding (ECE)

Chris Buck (ECE)

Minyang Ma (ECE)

Problem

Urinalysis is a non-invasive medical tool that can provide valuable information on a wide range of health concerns. However, while urinalysis is commonly used in a clinical setting it isn’t readily available outside the doctor’s office for individual patient use. The HiT team is creating a daily urinalysis device that can provide long term monitoring of a chronic medical conditions such as diabetes as well as general health and wellness such as hydration. The goal is a functioning Hospital in a Toilet which through a different combination of sensors depending on the user’s health profile, can provide comprehensive daily health monitoring.

Report

Read our report titled "Hospital in Toilet"

What we achieved in one semester

  • 3D Printed Device Prototype
  • Built System Architecture for Hydration Monitoring System: Sensors → Microcontroller → Bluetooth Module → Phone → Server
  • Developed User App to present results and recommendations
  • 1st Place in ECE Affiliates Day Poster Competition, Undergrad
  • 3rd in Space Health Challenge
  • 5th in Rice Elevator Pitch Competition

What we hope to do next

  • Identify next device function: Diabetes, pregnancy, UTI, kidney health
  • Test and incorporate new sensors: Spectrometer
  • Expand App Functionality: Graphing health trends over time, User reminder alerts throughout the day

Tid Bits

  • Meeting with NASA and NSBRI representatives about a potential “Space Hospital in a Toilet”

SmartScope

Diagnose Anemia on your Phone

Team Members

Disha Kumar (BioChem)

Kyle Bailey (CS)

Sunny Kim (CS)

Marco Tocchetto (ECE)

Problem

According to the World Health Organization, anemia affects about 2 billion people worldwide including over 50% of pregnant women. Most of these affected people reside in developing countries. Without treatment, an anemic condition can cause fatigue, malaise, shortness of breath, and rapid heartbeat. There are several types of anemia; diagnosing the type of anemia is essential to treating patients with anemia. However, standard methods to diagnose anemia in developing regions only measure hemoglobin concentration and do not diagnose the type of anemia. The blood smear is a common procedure performed in healthcare settings to diagnose anemia type. However, it is labor- and time- intensive. Our smartphone device seeks to magnify and process blood smear images to easily diagnose types of anemia in low-resource settings.

Report

Read our report titled "SmartScope: Using Mobile Microscopy to Characterize Anemia"

What we achieved in one semester

  • Built a low-cost microscope attachment for smartphones
  • Developed a smartphone application for on-the-spot anemia diagnostic report
  • Established preliminary accuracy results for proof of concept

What we hope to do next

  • Diagnose additional types of anemia
  • Finalize microscope attachment for improved image quality
  • Gather more data for further validation of accuracy results for real-world implementation

Tid Bits

  • Vacuum cleaners are useful: countless hours were spent desperately searching for our 1mm microlens on the carpet

Scalable Health Initiative